Showing posts with label Disestablishment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Disestablishment. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

VPU-1 ‘Old Buzzards’ to disestablish

Special Projects Patrol Squadron (VPU) 1 will hold its disestablishment ceremony April 27 at 10 a.m. at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117.

The “Old Buzzards” trace their lineage back 40 years when the Chief of Naval Operations requested the creation of a specially trained maritime patrol unit possessing the necessary expertise, flexibility and quick reaction capability to respond to immediate tasking from the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

As a result, a unique “special projects” detachment of P-3s was formed from operationally proven aircrew and maintenance professionals.

As the demand for P-3 Special Projects assets increased, the detachment became an independent unit under the command of its first officer-in-charge. During this period, the Sailors of VPU-1 continued their proud tradition of operational maritime patrol expertise, rapid response and professionalism.

The Old Buzzards served during the Cold War, in Operation Desert Shield/Storm, as well as numerous other military operations and crises.

In March 1996, the unit was formally established as a patrol squadron under the command of Cmdr. Walter Kreitler. For more than 16 years the "Old Buzzards" upheld the highest standards of the U.S. Navy and the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force.

The squadron, flying at least two specially equipped Orions, has operated from NAS Jax since July 2009 when they relocated from NAS Brunswick, Maine.

Squadron personnel have earned seven Joint Meritorious Unit awards, six Navy Unit Commendations, seven Meritorious Unit Commendations, seven Navy Battle “E” awards and various other unit, service and campaign awards.

Several “Old Buzzards” alumni are in town for the disestablishment events that include the Buzzard Ball, a golf tournament and Buzzard Night at the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville to see the Suns play.

As part of the Friday ceremony, Cmdr. Lee Boyer, the last “Old Buzzards” commanding officer, will lower the command pennant and dismiss the squadron for the final time.
“It’s definitely going to be a bittersweet ceremony. On one hand, it is sad to see such a great squadron being retired – but on the other hand, disestablishment has renewed the bond between every generation of Old Buzzards. I have truly been humbled by the support and the obvious attachment that former and retired ‘Old Buzzards’ have for this squadron,” Boyer stated.

Cmdr. Chris McDowell, the former VPU-1 executive officer and now commanding officer of VPU-2 at MCAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii had these thoughts on the events.

“The ‘Old Buzzards’ of VPU-1, and the dedicated professionals, families and friends who support us, repeatedly accomplished some amazing things over the past 40 years. With several current ‘Old Buzzards’ destined to continue our fine tradition of mission accomplishment as members of our sister squadron, VPU-2, I look forward to carrying our unrivaled capabilities forward.”

Thursday, November 03, 2011

Navy to Disestablish Reserve Aviation Logistic Squadrons

VR-52 C-9B Aircraft will be struck from service at the end of FY12 (USN Photo)

According to an OpNav Notice 5400 dated 11 October 2011, the Navy will disetablish VR-46 (NAS/JRB Fort Worth), VR-48 (NAF Washington DC/Andrews AFB)and VR-52 (Joint Base McGuire Dix Lakehurst NJ) effective 30 Sep 2012. VR-46 and VR-52 will be divested of their C-9B aircraft and VR-48 will be divested of their C-20G aircraft. All aircraft are being categorized for strike.

Friday, September 30, 2011

U.S. 2nd Fleet to Disestablish Sept. 30

From U.S. 2nd Fleet Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet will hold a disestablishment ceremony here, Sept. 30, marking the end of 65 years of the organization's service to the fleet.

The ceremony is scheduled to be held outside of 2nd Fleet's maritime headquarters at Naval Station Norfolk, at 10:00 a.m., as the commander's flag is lowered for a final time.

U.S. 2nd Fleet's focus has been on safe fleet operations to achieve its mission in the C2F area of responsibility, providing trained and certified maritime forces for global assignment and teaming with allied and partner navies to execute the nation's maritime strategy.

The disestablishment of U.S. 2nd Fleet was announced Jan. 6, and is aligned with Department of Defense efforts to reduce overhead expenditures to protect force structure and invest in modernization. As U.S. 2nd Fleet disestablishes and merges with U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF), USFF will continue to provide the same level of performance and forces ready for tasking to combatant commanders.

U.S. 2nd Fleet traces its origin to the reorganization of the Navy following World War II and the creation of U.S. 8th Fleet headquartered in Norfolk, Va. Officially established March 1, 1946, the command was renamed 2nd Task Fleet in January 1947, and re-designated U.S. 2nd Fleet in February 1950.

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Naval Air Station Brunswick Marks End to Service

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ty Connors, Naval Air Station Brunswick Public Affairs

NAVAL AIR STATION BRUNSWICK, Maine (NNS) -- Naval Air Station Brunswick (NASB) held its disestablishment ceremony May 31, ending 68 years of service to the Navy.

NASB, situated on 3,200 acres in along Maine's mid-coast, originally opened in 1943, and was primarily used as a training base for the British Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm.

With the end of World War II, the base was put into caretaker status until it re-opened in 1951.

In 2005, the base was tapped for final closure by the Base Realignment and Closure Commission.

"The Sailors, civilians, and contractors of Naval Air Station Brunswick have done a remarkable job," said Jackalyne Pfannenstiel, the Assistant Secretary for Energy, Installations & Environment. "This is a major milestone, and I'm extremely impressed with everyone's efforts to prepare the base for redevelopment. This station has consistently met the deadlines and surpassed standards for redevelopment. It is my hope that the Navy's departure will pave the way for future development and job growth in this area. If this can't be a Naval Air Station, then it can be a business opportunity for the community."

During the closing ceremony, other speakers also saluted the long years of service by Sailors and civilians, and highlighted the tight bonds that grew between base personnel and the local community over the decades.

"We have been part of the community here," said Capt. William A. Fitzgerald, the base's 36th and final commanding officer. "But that is only because the community embraced us. You welcomed us into your neighborhoods and schools. You allowed us to become part of the woven fiber of this area."

In a nod to the base's history, Capt. Fitzgerald honored several former commanding officers in attendance, presenting them with Naval Air Station Brunswick ballcaps and nametags.

Fitzgerald also presented plaques to representatives of the local communities and the state of Maine for their support over the years.

At its height, NAS Brunswick employed some 4,000 Sailors and civilians to support the mission of patrol reconnaissance.

Many alumni returned to goodbye to the base where they flew and serviced the P-2 "Neptunes" and P-3 "Orions" that made up the bulk of patrol reconnaissance history.

VP-26, now stationed in Pensacola, Fla., sent a lone P-3 "Orion" as a silent witness to the historic ceremony.

In addition to speeches – including the keynote by retired Rear Adm. Harry Rich - the ceremony included history displays of the squadrons that had called NAS Brunswick home, a slide-show of photographs, and other walks down memory lane.

Rich, a Maine native, reminisced about the powerful influence a childhood experience at NASB had on his decision to seek a commission as a naval aviator. He further shared recollections of his tour at Brunswick later in his career and the way the people of Brunswick welcomed and supported his family and command.

Music for the ceremony was provided by the Brunswick and Mt. Ararat High Schools bands, while PS1 Leonard Bell of the BNAS Personnel Support Detachment sang the National Anthem.

The final touch was the lowering of the American flag for the final time at the installation.

The ceremony was immediately followed by a reception held by the Mid-Coast Regional Redevelopment Authority, which is charged with writing NAS Brunswick's next chapter.

"The Mid-Coast Regional Redevelopment Authority has done a wonderful job lining up businesses for the Brunswick Landing, which is the new facilities name," said Rear Adm. Robin Braun, of Brunswick and currently mobilized as the Deputy Director of Operations at U.S. European Command. "We can move from one era into another, and bring more jobs to the area to replace those Navy jobs lost."

"The (informal) state motto is 'the way life should be,' and Brunswick epitomizes that," continued Braun. "It is a great town to raise a family, it has been a great Navy town, and a wonderful place to come home. This place has had a huge impact on thousands of sailors over the years and will definitely be missed."

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Navy/Marine Corps Status Update


Back on May 22, 2009, I broke the news to the radio hobby on this blog that the Navy was working on sunsetting the Navy/Marine Corps MARS program. See my original article on this subject at http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/2009/05/nnwc-proposes-to-disestablish-navy-mc.html

While it appears the program isn't quite dead yet, unfortunately, they have managed to put it on life support. To you folks at HQ, time to let the patient die with some dignity. All the MARS programs have long outlived their usefulness to the military services. Quit wasting the taxpayers money, and while your at it take that useless cousin SHARES with you on the way out the door.

Here is the latest update from the Chief of Navy/Marine Corps MARS as of July 15.

DE NNN0ASA 051
R 151300Z JUL 2009
FM CHNAVMARCORMARS WILLIAMSBURG VA
TO ALNAVMARCORMARS
INFO ZEN/CHIEF ARMY MARS FT HUACHUCA AZ
ZEN/CHIEF AIR FORCE MARS SCOTT AFB IL
BT
UNCLAS
SUBJ: CHNAVMARCORMARS BCST 04-09
A. CHNAVMARCORMARS WILLIAMSBURG VA 162200Z MAY 2009
B. DOD INSTRUCTION 4650.02 (PROPOSED) NOTAL

1. THIS BROADCAST UPDATES REF A.

2. THE NEGOTIATIONS ON REF B ARE STILL IN PROGRESS. WE DO NOT KNOW HOW MUCH LONGER THIS WILL TAKE.

3. I HAVE RECEIVED THE FOLLOWING DIRECTION FROM COMMANDER, NAVAL NETWORK WARFARE COMMAND (NNWC) VIA COMMANDER, NAVAL COMPUTER AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS AREA MASTER STATION ATLANTIC (NCTAMS LANT):

QUOTE
THE MARS PROGRAM WILL REMAIN INTACT FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR, HOWEVER, IT WILL BE COMPRISED OF ONLY ONE GS POSITION (YOURS). THE MARS MISSION WILL REMAIN ALIGNED UNDER NCTAMS LANT. ALL MILITARY BILLETS AND THE CIVILIAN POSITION WERE ZEROED OUT IN FY2010 AND BEYOND, THE MILITARY POSTIONS WILL NOT BE REINSTATED.
UNQUOTE

4. IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE ABOVE DIRECTION:

A. AREA DIRECTORS WILL TRANSFER ALL MEMBERSHIP RECORDS TO HQ NOT LATER THAN 31 AUG 2009. WHEN RECORDS HAVE BEEN TRANSFERRED, STATE DIRECTORS WILL SEND ALL MEMBERSHIP RELATED MATTERS DIRECTLY TO CHNAVMARCORMARS VICE THE AREA DIRECTOR. (NORTHEAST AND SOUTH AREA RECORDS HAVE ALREADY BEEN TRANSFERRED TO HQ.)

B. AREA DIRECTORS WILL CLOSE DOWN THEIR OFFICES AND TURN IN ALL EQUIPMENT TO DRMO NOT LATER THAN 30 SEP 2009. (SEPARATE GUIDANCE WILL BE PROVIDED TO CENTRAL AND PACIFIC AREA DIRECTORS.)

C. NONE OF THE EQUIPMENT AT THE AREA DIRECTORS STATIONS WILL BE TRANSFERRED TO ANY MEMBERS UNLESS SPECIFICALLY APPROVED BY NNN0ASA. THE EQUIPMENT MAY BE TRANSFERRED TO OTHER OFFICIAL NAVY ORGANIZATIONS (LIKE MWR OR SPECIAL SERVICES) TO HELP EQUIP OR START UP MILITARY RECREATION STATIONS. THESE TRANSFERS WILL BE APPROVED BY HQ ON A CASE-BY-CASE BASIS. ANY REMAINING EQUIPMENT WILL BE TURNED IN TO DRMOS.

5. THESE CHANGES AND THE PENDING ISSUANCE OF REF B WILL REQUIRE A COMPLETE RE-WRITE OF NTP 8(D) (DRAFT). IN THE INTERIM, WHEN THE AREA DIRECTORS ARE TRANSFERRED, THE DEPUTY AREA DIRECTORS WILL ADMINISTER AREA STAFFS TO SUPPORT THE REGIONS AND STATES IN THEIR AREA. THEY WILL TAKE OVER RESPONSIBILITY FOR COMPILING QUARTERLY ACTIVITY SUMMARIES AND FREQUENCY USAGE REPORTS.

6. MARS: TOGETHER WE CAN ACHIEVE ANYTHING

BT
NNNN

Friday, June 05, 2009

NAVMARCORMARS Status

I first revealed on this blog, that the Navy was thinking of disestablishing the Navy-Marine Corps MARS radio service. See my post of May 22, 2009 at
http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/2009/05/nnwc-proposes-to-disestablish-navy-mc.html



Now this official update from the Chief, Navy-Marine Corps MARS:

CHNAVMARCORMARS INFO BCST 20-091.

NAVMARCORMARS STATUS: OPNAV AND DOD HAVE YET TO RESOLVE WHETHER THE NAVY WILL BE ALLOWED TO 'SUNSET' THE MARS MISSION. I UNDERSTAND THAT SOME MEMBERS OF OTHER MARS SERVICES ARE MISINTERPRETING THE WORDS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE MARS CHIEFS AND ARE PRESSURING OUR MEMBERS TO JOIN THEIR SERVICE. THIS IS TOTALLY OUT OF LINE AND SHOULD NOT BE OCCURING. IF, I REPEAT IF, DOD ALLOWS NAVY TO TERMINATE NAVMARCORMARS, WE WILL ADDRESS THIS IN AN OFFICIAL MANNER. OTHERWISE CONTINUE NAVMARCORMARS OPERATIONS AS NORMAL.

Friday, May 22, 2009

NNWC Proposes to Disestablish the Navy-MC MARS Program

I have been one of the biggest critics of the three DoD MARS services in recent years. My advice in MT editorials back in the day was to combine the three MARS services or die. After a high level GAO investigation of the Army MARS program, it was determined that they needed to make changes or else. On paper the Army MARS did what they needed to do to stay alive, but the bottom line is this -- MARS is still is a relict of the Cold War and they aren't really fulfilling their basic missions. Morph them into other things but other things are also competing for the same HS bucks.

I still contend that in the current operational environment there is no real mission that they (MARS) has that warrants supporting three separate MARS services and their waste and abuse of precious radio spectrum frequencies. If I hear one more MARS net taking about their latest ailments or how the tomato plants in their gardens are doing, blood will shoot out my eyeballs. For you fools on these nets who love to ragchew, leave that for the ham bands, not on HF government freqs. You have a job to do and discussing your latest aches and pains is not one of them.

So thanks to NNWC, we finally have some sanity is being exhibited by one of the military services. Of course, the real sad truth is this is all a result of the current administration and their DoD budget cutting axe that has really caused this issue. As a friend of mine says, "hope you are happy with the choices you made last November because elections do have consequences."

My suggestion to the remaining two MARS services -- combine or risk the same end as the Navy-MC MARS program.

Now, if I could only get the Feds to take a look at the biggest waste of the taxpayer dollar in the HF radio spectrum -- the SHARES HF radio program -- then I will really be a happy camper.

DE NNN0ASA 040
R 162200Z MAY 2009
FM CHNAVMARCORMARS WILLIAMSBURG VA
TO ALNAVMARCORMARS
INFO ZEN/CHIEF ARMY MARS FT HUACHUCA AZ
ZEN/CHIEF AIR FORCE MARS SCOTT AFB IL
BT

UNCLAS

SUBJ: CHNAVMARCORMARS BCST 03-09
A. DOD DIRECTIVE 4650.2 DTD 26 JAN 1998
B. DOD INSTRUCTION 4650.02 (PROPOSED) NOTAL

1. COMMANDER, NAVAL NETWORK WARFARE COMMAND (NNWC) HAS DECIDED TO 'SUNSET' THE MARS MISSION WITHIN NAVY AS OF 30 SEP 2009. NNWC HAS REQUESTED ALL MILITARY BILLETS AND MY CIVILIAN POSITION BE DELETED AND UNFUNDED AFTER THAT DATE. OPNAV HAS NOT YET APPROVED THIS REQUEST.

2. ALL THREE MARS SERVICES HAVE OPERATED UNDER THE MANDATE OF REF A, WHICH IS STILL VALID. REF B IS A PROPOSED UPDATE TO REF A AND IS IN THE PROCESS OF BEING COORDINATED BETWEEN DOD AND THE THREE SERVICES. REF B INCREASES THE SERVICES REQUIREMENT TO SUPPORT THE MARS PROGRAMS WITHIN THEIR SERVICE. ARMY AND AIR FORCE HAVE AGREED TO THE CHANGES BUT NAVY (OPNAV) HAS ASKED TO BE LET OUT OF THIS REQUIREMENT. THIS NEGOTIATION IS STILL IN PROCESS AND WE DO NOT KNOW WHEN IT WILL BE
RESOLVED.

3. AS A CONSEQUENCE OF NNWC DECISION TO 'SUNSET' THE MARS MISSION, I AM FORCED TO INITIATE ACTION TO CLOSE DOWN NAVY-MARINE CORPS OPERATIONS AND FACILITIES BY 30 SEP 2009. ACCORDINGLY:

A. AREA DIRECTORS WILL TRANSFER ALL MEMBERSHIP RECORDS TO HQ NLT THAN 31 JUL 2009. WHEN RECORDS HAVE BEEN TRANSFERRED, STATE DIRECTORS WILL SEND ALL MEMBERSHIP RELATED MATTERS DIRECTLY TO CHNAVMARCORMARS VICE THE AREA DIRECTOR.

B. AREA DIRECTORS WILL CLOSE DOWN THEIR OFFICES AND TURN IN ALL EQUIPMENT TO DRMO NOT LATER THAN 30 SEP 2009.

C. NONE OF THE EQUIPMENT AT THE AREA DIRECTORS STATIONS WILL BE ALLOWED TO BE TRANSFERRED TO ANY MEMBERS. THE EQUIPMENT MAY BE TRANSFERRED TO OTHER OFFICIAL NAVY ORGANIZATIONS (LIKE MWR OR SPECIAL SERVICES) TO HELP EQUIP OR START UP MILITARY RECREATION STATIONS. THESE TRANSFERS WILL BE APPROVED BY HQ ON A CASE-BY-CASE BASIS.

4. IF NAVY'S REQUEST TO BE DELETED FROM REF B IS NOT APPROVED, THERE WILL BE A NAVY-MARINE CORPS MARS PROGRAM BUT IT WILL NOT HAVE AREA DIRECTORS (THEY WILL HAVE BEEN TRANSFERRED). ALL MEMBERSHIP CORRESPONDENCE WILL BE HANDLED BETWEEN THE STATE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF, NAVMARCORMARS DIRECTLY. AREA DEPUTY DIRECTOR AND AREA STAFF POSITIONS WILL BE RETAINED TO COORDINATE FREQUENCY MATTERS, TRAINING, ETC.. ALL OPERATIONAL MATTERS WILL BE HANDLED BY STATE AND REGION DIRECTORS.

5. I WILL INFORM YOU AS SOON AS I FIND OUT THE FINAL RESOLUTION OF NAVY'S REQUEST TO 'SUNSET' NAVY-MARINE CORPS MARS.

BT
NNNN

I will have further updates as they are available

Saturday, March 14, 2009

US Coast Guard to Discontinue Loran Stations

Courtesy of the ARRL newsletter.

Last month, the US Coast Guard announced that due to economic conditions, they would be closing down the 24 LORAN-C (Long Range Aid to Navigation) stations operated under the auspices of the USCG. LORAN stations provide navigation, location and timing services for both civil and military air, land and marine users. According to the USCG, LORAN-C is approved as an en route supplemental air navigation system for both Instrument Flight Rule (IFR) and Visual Flight Rule (VFR) operations. The LORAN-C system serves the 48 continental states, their coastal areas and parts of Alaska.

LORAN-A stations were developed beginning in World War II, and signals were transmitted on frequencies in and around our present-day 160 meter band. LORAN-A was responsible for reduced amateur radio operations, including frequency and power limitations, on 160 meters in the United States. In 1979, the Coast Guard phased out the LORAN-A stations; they were replaced by LORAN-C stations. The newer stations operated on 100 kHz, enabling the restrictions on the 160 meter amateur band due to LORAN functions, to be dropped.

According to the Coast Guard, the nation's oldest continuous sea-going service will continue to operate the current LORAN-C system through the end of fiscal year 2009; it is in the process of preparing detailed plans for implementing the fiscal year 2010 budget. According to USCG Vice Commandant and Chief Operating Officer Vice Admiral V. S. Crea, further details of the LORAN-C termination plan will be available upon the submission of the President's full budget. -- Some information provided by Cliff Appel, W7CGA

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Checkmates Fly from Iraq into Sunset

By Clark Pierce, Naval Air Station Jacksonville Public Affairs

Two S-3B Vikings assigned to the "Checkmates" of Sea Control Squadron Twenty Two (VS-22) conduct an airborne refueling, during routine flight operations from aboard Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). George Washington Carrier Strike Group is currently participating in Partnership of the Americas, a maritime training and readiness deployment of the U.S. Naval Forces with Caribbean and Latin American countries in support of the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) objectives for enhanced maritime security. (U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Christopher Stephens)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- The Sailors of Sea Control Squadron (VS) 22 returned to Naval Air Station Jacksonville Dec. 15 after completing a five-month deployment to Al-Asad Air Base, Iraq, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Their boots-on-the-ground and eyes-in-the-sky deployment in Iraq, required that VS-22 pilots, aircrew and maintainers operate in a very dangerous environment, substantially different to the conditions they normally encounter as a carrier-based platform.

To meet the demands of this mission, each of the 205 "Checkmates" completed anti-terrorism and desert survival training, in addition to qualifying with the M-16 rifle and M-9 pistol, prior to their deployment.

The large Al Asad Air Base (formerly Saddam Hussein's premier MiG-25 Foxbat air base) is located south of the Euphrates River in the volatile, largely Sunni, Al Anbar Province in western Iraq.

The squadron brought four S-3B Vikings to Al Asad, each equipped with the latest LANTIRN (Low Altitude Navigation Targeting Infrared for Night) navigation pod. LANTIRN is a terrain-following radar that enables pilots to maneuver and surveil at low altitudes during daylight or at night. According Lt. Jason Tarrant, the squadron flew about 80 percent of its non-traditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (NTISR) combat missions at night.

"The Viking's LANTIRN infrared capability was invaluable for taking away the cover of darkness from enemy combatants," said Tarrant. "The Checkmates routinely detected heat signatures of vehicles, shelters, people and IEDs (improvised explosive devices) –and relayed that information to convoys and combat teams in the affected area."

The Checkmates flew an average of three sorties a day.

"Our VS-22 maintenance personnel displayed tireless dedication to keep these soon-to-be-retired birds mission ready. As far as I know, we sustained a 100 percent sortie completion record," said Tarrant.

VS-22 is the Navy's last S-3B Viking squadron. Disestablishment activities are scheduled for Jan. 28-30.

Saturday, October 11, 2008

VS-32 "Maulers" Disestablished

By Clark Pierce, Naval Air Station Jacksonville Public Affairs



JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (NNS) -- Sailors, family members, retirees and friends of VS-32 turned out to bid farewell to the command during its disestablishment ceremony in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville (NAS Jax)Sept. 25.

"This is an event that brings us closer the end of our S-3 community. The Maulers have always been one of the best-led and best-managed sea control squadrons in the fleet," said Capt. Jim Paulsen, commander, Carrier Air Wing 1 who was the guest speaker for the event.

"The S-3 sunset plan is part of the Navy's goal to streamline logistics and squadron support. The idea was that our mission can be assumed by other communities," stated VS-32 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Doug Carpenter. "But the legacy of our community and what this squadron has accomplished will live on."

He told the audience, including a dozen former VS-32 skippers, that the Maulers will be remembered for their years of battle readiness and safety in the S-3 community. The squadron earned 10 Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (COMNAVAIRLANT) Battle "E" awards; six Capt. Arnold J. Isbell trophies for excellence in anti-submarine warfare (ASW); six Adm. Jimmy Thach awards for meritorious achievement by an ASW squadron; and 15 Chief of Naval Operations Safety "S" awards. The squadron also received two Lockheed-Martin Golden Wrench awards for maintenance excellence; a COMNAVAIRLANT Silver Anchor award for retention; and the Arleigh Burke award for the most improved squadron.

"I can safely say that this squadron has sprinted to the finish line, thanks to the hard work and professionalism of a long list of distinguished Sailors that wear the Mauler patch with pride. At the top of that list is a man who I believe is a hurricane of energy and professionalism – my Command Master Chief, Adrian Andrews. When [Andrews] made landfall at VS-32 in 2007, he immediately set a course to unify the chiefs' mess, reinvigorate the career development process and provide a role model for positive leadership. It has been my honor to serve with Master Chief Andrews," said Carpenter.

As part of the ceremony, Paulsen presented Carpenter with the Meritorious Service Medal for his unmatched personal initiative and intense commitment to excellence that sustained high-tempo combat support operations during the squadron's sunset cruise.

Carpenter, in turn, presented the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to AE1(AW/SW) Robert Barber Jr., who is also VS-32's Sailor of the Year. His leadership for plane captains and troubleshooters in the line division led to the completion of 308 sorties and 520 mishap-free flight hours.

The Maulers completed their sunset cruise and the final carrier deployment for the S-3 Viking in December 2007. As a component of Carrier Air Wing 1, the squadron supported ground forces in Afghanistan and Iraq by conducting maritime security operations. During the deployment, Mauler aviators flew 960 sorties totaling more than 2,200 flight hours. The squadron was at sea for 180 days, with only 13 days in port.

The ceremony concluded as Carpenter read his orders and relinquished his command to close another chapter of the S-3 aviation family album. The Navy's only remaining S-3 squadron, the VS-22 "Checkmates," is slated for decommissioning at NAS Jax in January.