Monday, July 15, 2013

Air Force Thunderbirds, combat aircraft no longer grounded after budget cuts

According to FoxNews, many of the Air Force's combat aircraft started flying again Monday as the military reshuffled its spending priorities to get its pilots additional training. Those aircraft have been grounded since April because of budget cuts.

The grounding affected about one-third of active-duty combat craft, including squadrons of fighters, bombers, and airborne warning and control craft.

Officials at Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia said the order affects planes in the U.S., Europe and the Pacific.

"Since April we've been in a precipitous decline with regard to combat readiness," Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of Air Combat Command, said in a statement. "Returning to flying is an important first step but what we have ahead of us is a measured climb to recovery."

The Air Force has said it generally takes 60 to 90 days to conduct the training needed to return aircrews to mission-ready status. For the past several months, many pilots have been using simulators to try to keep their skills sharp.

The grounding affected A-10, B-1, E-3, F-15, F-16 and F-22 aircraft, as well as various Aggressor and test aircraft. In the U.S., the affected aircraft were stationed at bases in Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, North Carolina, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah and Virginia.

The popular Thunderbirds demonstration team comprised of F-16s also will resume training flights, but all 2013 shows will remain canceled, said Lt. Col. Tadd Sholtis, an Air Combat Command spokesman.

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